[Big-Little] [Killer] [ Legs] [10 Bulls] [ Golf] [Baseball] [51/55 in Fives] [25] [Hockey]

Big-Little

This game is a little difficult to explain, but I'll give it a go. This game can be played with any number of participants. All participants start with zero marks. Once you acquire five marks, you are eliminated from the game. Everyone first corks to determine the order of play. The person going first has an 'open' board and can aim at any target they want to. Targets are considered any inclosed area. So everything within the scoring area of a dartboard are valid targets. The catch is that all of the numbers on the outside of the board (usually on a wire) that have a 0, 4, 6, 8, or 9 in them are also targets (those numbers have an inclosed area). When the first person hits a valid target, their turn is then over and the next person must hit that mark, even if the target hit was not the one aimed at. If they hit it with their first or second dart, then they can establish a new target with their next dart. If they hit it with their third dart, then they get another turn and start off with an open board. If they miss the target with all three darts, then they get a mark and the next person has to hit that target. If a person sets a target, and everyone misses it and it comes back to them, they can choose to sit on that target and make everyone try to hit it again for one more round, or they can shoot at a new target. Also, if a person is trying to set a target, and their third dart bounces out, the next person then has an open board. Here are some of the terms used in this game:

little (1-20) - that part of the number that resides between the edge of the triple ring and the edge of the bullseye

big (1-20) - that part of the number between the edge of the triple ring and the edge of the double ring

double (1-20) - dart in the double

triple (1-20) - dart in the triple

single/double bull - self-explanatory

open board - the thrower can aim at anything they want to

Strategy: Generally anyone shooting on an open board will try to hit something like a loop in the 8. Throw at the hardest possible target for someone to hit. If you are down to your last dart, then either aim for a bull or a triple. You don't want to give the person throwing next an open board. If you aim at a double, not only is there a chance you might miss outside, but if you miss inside the next person has a rather large target to shoot at. If you manage to hit something that nobody else was able to hit, why not sit on it for a round. You've already given everyone one point, why not go for two. Also, if you know the person that shoots after you has a problem hitting certain numbers or targets, it doesn't hurt to aim for them (though they may not think so!). My main weakness are the three doubles at the bottom of the board and, they are common targets for a number of my 'friends'.

[Big-Little] [Killer] [ Legs] [10 Bulls] [ Golf] [Baseball] [ 51/55 in Fives] [25] [ Hockey]

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Killer

If you want to practice your ability to hit doubles, this is one way to do it. Everyone throws one dart at the board with their non-throwing hand. The number they hit is their number, even if it is a bull. If someone else should also hit that number, they will need to throw another dart. The person with the lowest number will throw first, second lowest throw second, and so on. To become a killer, each player has to hit the double of their number. When they have done that, mark their initials showing that they are a killer (we circle their initials, some people write a K next to their initials). Now that you are a killer, you want to knock the other players out of the game by hitting their doubles. Each time you hit their double, they get a mark. Once a player has three marks, they are out of the game. If you should accidentally hit your own number, you then give yourself a mark. If you are not a killer, and hit someone elses double, nothing happens.

Strategy: This is one of those games that the best thrower will not always win. In most games, people will form little alliances to knock out the better thrower by only throwing at his number until he/she is out. If two or more of you opponents happen to have numbers next to each other, shoot at them. If you miss the one your aiming at, maybe you will hit one that is next to it.

Other Variations

  1. Once you become a killer, you can only shoot at those people that are not killers. You can only shoot at people that are also killers when everyone left in the game is a killer.

  2. Use triples instead of doubles. If you hit the bull, you still have to shoot at the double bull.

  3. If you should happen to hit your number while you are a killer, you lose your killer status and must hit it again to become a killer.

  4. Instead of throwing your dart to determine your target, write all of the 21 possible targets on pieces of paper and have each person draw the number they will throw at. This is a good method if you have someone in your group that can throw with both arms. It keeps them from being able to hit the number they want. I've never had that problem. I do good just to hit the board throwing left-handed.

  5. Everyone starts as a killer, you do not have to hit your target to become a killer.

[Big-Little] [Killer] [ Legs] [10 Bulls] [ Golf] [Baseball] [ 51/55 in Fives] [25] [ Hockey]

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Legs

This is probably the easiest game to explain. Everyone corks with the winner of the cork throwing first. He/she will throw all three darts adding up their score. The next person has to beat that score (ties do not count). If they beat the score, then the next person has to beat that score. If they do not beat the score, they will get a mark and the next person has to beat whatever it was they hit. Five marks and you are out of the game.

Strategy: Pay attention to the score you have to beat. If after your first two darts you only need a couple more points to beat your opponents score, then aim toward a section of the board where all the numbers are more than you need. Don't aim at the 20 because you could miss and hit a 1. To win is to not be knocked out, not always trying to hit the most points. Also, don't forget about the bull. A single bull and two 20s is worth 65 points, making the next player have to shoot more than a bed shot on 20s and there is always a chance you will hit the double bull.

[Big-Little] [Killer] [ Legs] [10 Bulls] [ Golf] [Baseball] [ 51/55 in Fives] [25] [ Hockey]

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10 Bulls

We never have come up with a better name, so this one works. This game is generally played by only two people, but you can play with teams. Both players cork, the winner gets to decide whether they will shoot at bulls, or shoot for points. The player shooting at the bulls will continue to do so until they have hit a total of ten bulls (double bulls do count as two). While that player shoots for bulls, the other is shooting for points. They can score points only by hitting numbers from the triple ring out to the double ring. Triple and doubles do count. If they are going for points, and hit a bull, the player shooting at bulls will get credit for that bull. If the player shooting at bulls should hit a number from the triple ring out to the double ring, the person scoring points will get those points that were hit. Once the player aiming for bulls has hit the 10th one, the players then swap targets. The winner will be the thrower with the most points and 10 bulls.

Strategy: If you are good at triples, that is the fastest way to score points. The down side to this is that if you miss the triple, you take a chance at not scoring any points. Three fat 20s are still worth 60 points.

Other Variations

  1. I have played a version where the person scoring the points could only count the points scored above 60. So if their three darts only scored 45 points, they would get credit for none. But if they scored 100 points, they would get credit for 40. This version requires the person scoring points to hit either a double or a triple in each turn.

[Big-Little] [Killer] [ Legs] [10 Bulls] [ Golf] [Baseball] [51/55 in Fives] [25] [ Hockey]

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Golf

This game is played with the number 1-18 in order (the first turn you go for one, then next you shoot at two, etc.). The object of the game is to have the fewest points. If you miss the number will all three darts, it is considered a bogey and you get five points. A double is worth one point (hole in one), a triple is worth two points. The largest section of that number (the part between the double and triple sections) is worth four points, and the section between the triple and bullseye is worth three points. You can end your turn at any time. So if you hit a triple and want to count the two, you can stop then. But if you decide to continue then that throw does not count. So if you hit a triple and decide to throw again and fail to hit that number, then your score will be a five.

Strategy: If your good at doubles, go for it. It is obviously the lowest number. But if you are good at triples and are not throwing against someone that hits alot of doubles, that two or three score is still better than a four or five.

[Big-Little] [Killer] [ Legs] [10 Bulls] [ Golf] [Baseball] [ 51/55 in Fives] [25] [ Hockey]

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Baseball

This game is played with the number 1-9 (representing the innings in a baseball game). Everyone shoots at the one on the first turn trying to hit as many as possible. A triple is worth three runs, a double worth two, a single worth one. Maximum score per inning would be 9 (three triples). The player at the end of the ninth inning with the most runs, wins. If there is a tie, then you go to the 10th inning (everyone aims at the ten). This will continue this way until someone has the lead at the end of an inning. If you should get to the 21st inning, then both teams will aim at the bulls. If there is still a tie, you then cork with the person closest to the center of the board being declared the winner.

Other Variations

  1. If a thrower hits the number with all three darts, they get another turn at that number. This continues until he/she does not hit that number with all three darts.

  2. In this variation, each player throws at the bulls before throwing at their designated number. If they miss the bull with all three darts, they get a zero scored for that turn and can not throw/bat that inning. All three darts are thrown at the bull regardless of how many times the bull gets hit. If at least one bull is hit, then the thrower throws all three darts at the number indicating what inning it is. That number is then multiplied by the number of bulls hit giving the total score for that inning (ie. player hits 5 sevens and 3 bulls giving a score of 15 runs).

[Big-Little] [Killer] [ Legs] [10 Bulls] [ Golf] [Baseball] [ 51/55 in Fives] [25] [ Hockey]

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51/55 In Fives

Both of these games are fundamentally the same. Each player throws three darts and adds up their score. If that score can be evenly divisible by five, the thrower divides their score by five and add that number to their score. For example, if the total score for the turn is 45, then the thrower gets to add 9 points to their score. But if the total is 43, they get no points since 43 cannot be evenly divisible by five. All three darts must count for the score to count. If one bounces out, or misses the scoring section of the board, zero points will be scored for that turn. The throwers continue to do this until one of them either gets to 51 or 55, depending on the game they are playing. If the user goes over 51/55, then it is considered a bust and they go back to what they had. So if you are playing 51, and currently have 48 points, then you must score exactly 15 points on your turn (ie. single 8, single 4, single 3). Now, for the difference in 51 and 55 (other than the total points needed), is that in 55, no two darts can land in the same number on the same turn. For example, if you throw two 20s, then your turn is over and you get zero points. If you are not a very accurate thrower, 55 can get quite frustrating. If you are playing 51, you might want to aim at the 15/10 area. No matter how many of each you hit, your score will be evenly divisible by five.

[Big-Little] [Killer] [ Legs] [10 Bulls] [ Golf] [Baseball] [ 51/55 in Fives] [25] [ Hockey]

25

This game was sent to me by Karlheinz Zoechling (click on his name to go to his home page). This is like doubles rotation except for the following. You start with 25 points and throw three darts on the doubles from 1 to 20, and then the last three darts at the bull. If you hit the double, you add the score (if you are on double 6 and hit it twice, you can add 24 points to your score). If you don't hit the double with your three darts you subtract the points of the unhit double (if you are throwing at the double 13, and don't hit it, you subtract 26 points). Either way, you then proceed to the next number on your next turn. If your score falls below 0, you are out of the game. The person with the most points after the bulls, or the last person left in the game is the winner.

[Big-Little] [Killer] [ Legs] [10 Bulls] [ Golf] [Baseball] [ 51/55 in Fives] [25] [ Hockey]

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Hockey

I found this game posted in the alt.sport.darts.FAQ by Paul Broussard. This is basically a two-player game. To start, flip a coin to see who goes first. The winner throws for bulls, if one is hit then he/she "has the puck". They now can throw at any double they choose, getting one point for each double hit. Their opponent now must hit the bull to "get the puck". This continues until someone reaches a pre-determined score, usually 10. This is good practice game for doubles and bulls.

[Big-Little] [Killer] [ Legs] [10 Bulls] [ Golf] [Baseball] [51/55 in Fives] [25] [ Hockey]

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